Category Patient information

Relapse of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection – patient information sheet

Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (septicaemia) information card [Patient Label ] [ [ You were recently diagnosed with a blood infection caused by a bacterium called Staphylococcus aureus (“Golden Staph”). This infection has been treated with intravenous antibiotics. Whilst this usually cures the infection, there is a possibility that your infection could return within 3 months […]

Outpatient MRSA decolonisation instructions

Your recent pathology test showed that you are carrying a strain of resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria that occasionally can cause serious infection.  See also this NSW MRSA Fact sheet.    This treatment aims to completely remove the MRSA from your body. In about half of the people treated in this way, the MRSA remains undetectable for yearsand […]

Patient advice: recurrent staphylococcal infection

Recurrent staphylococcal infection:  Natural history Virulent strains of Staph. aureus (including golden staph- MRSA) are responsible for recurrent skin and soft tissue infections (eg. boils)in previously well individuals (children and adults). The infections may recur over many months. Eventually some degree of immunity develops and the episodes become less frequent. However episodes may continue to occur for […]

Managing patients with asplenia and hyposplenia

People who have had a splenectomy or have poorly functioning spleens are at higher risk of infection. These patients require education about early identification of infections and may require additional immunisations or prophylactic antibiotics. Spleen Australia is an organisation in Melbourne that provides resources to both patients and health professionals for dealing with absent or poorly functioning […]

Cellulitis 101 – importance of routine skin care

Many patients with lower limb cellulitis have pre-existing venous stasis dermatitis, solar damage or other skin conditions that impair the natural skin barrier.  This posting is derived from an existing HICSIG patient handout .