Category Weird facts

Revisiting #SaveTheScript 2015 – short film meets AMS

In 2015 NPS MedicineWise partnered with Tropfest, to launch a short film competition to raise awareness about antibiotic resistance.  Here are our picks of the 15 finalists– definitely worth a revisit! First prize – “The Pick Up” of the not-so lovely Ms Gonorrhoea! “Antibiotic man”  “Pills“ The #savethescript judging panel included:  Dr Andrew Rochford, Seven Network Health Editor […]

Antibiotic Resistance: Facts and Figures

While we spend a lot of time talking about reducing antibiotic resistance it can difficult to get a feel for the size of the problem. The team at BioMerieux have put together some facts and figures that help quantify the problem.

Chocolate Agar for Easter

Chocolate agar is an enriched non specific growth medium which is used to grow and isolate pathogenic bacteria. Its also known as chocolate blood agar and is made using blood that has been slowly heated to 80 degrees. So probably not a great choice as a gift! Chocolate agar is a variant of blood agar […]

Paranoia 101 – where is it safe to put your hand?

A recent experiment mapped the bacterial travellers on the New York Subway system and found that grabbing a handrail transmits the same number of bacteria as shaking hands with 10 000 people. An average of 2 million colony forming units were found per square inch, which for frequent travellers, equates to 900 times more than airplane […]

Antimicrobial prophylaxis for leech therapy

Leeches have been used throughout history for a variety of different medical indications. Over exploitation of medical leech species throughout the 19th century lead to the species becoming threatened. Today medical leeches are breed in special populations. Medicinal leech therapy is increasing in popularity to assist in wound healing where venous congestion is a problem. Leeches […]

Are faecal transplants the answer?

Faecal transplants are recommended for all sorts of ailments these days. Indications recommended (not always by doctors!) include weight loss, inflammatory bowel disease and autism. The best evidence for faecal transplants, however, is in the treatment of C. difficile disease.

How did bacteria become resistant?

We all know that antibiotic resistance increases through improper use of antibiotics. With recent discoveries of bacteria containing antibiotic resistance genes in isolated tribes it would seem that bacteria have always been resistant- so why is it such a problem now?

Merry Christmas

Best wishes from the AIMED team! Picture Credit: http://www.scq.ubc.ca/

Another disease without a cure

An excellent review article published in the recent Christmas edition of the BMJ has highlighted another infection with no known cure. This infection is spreading rapidly with no known treatment and no vaccine in sight.

How do you prescribe vancomycin?

If you’d like to brush up on your vancomycin prescribing skills then this new interactive tutorial is for you.