Tag Archives: Josh Davis

New antibiotics on the (near) horizon – a report from Josh Davis from recent USA ID Week

Guest posting: Assoc. Prof. Josh Davis, President, Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases. @Guru_JoshD “ID week” is a large US infectious diseases conference; this year it was in San Francisco, and had over 8,000 delegates. The most talked about trial at this conference (mentioned in at least 5 different sessions) was the Australian-led MERINO trial, an […]

You are what you eat – or should our gut microbiome be considered an important body system in its own right?

Guest posting: Assoc. Prof. Josh Davis,  Principal Research Fellow/NHMRC Career Development Fellow, Menzies School of Health Research, Senior Staff Specialist Infectious Diseases Physician, John Hunter Hospital, Conjoint Professor School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle The diverse bacterial communities which live in our gastrointestinal tract (primary in the colon), are collectively known as the “gut microbiota” and their collective […]

Hepatitis C- updates on biology and new treatments from Prof. Josh Davis

Guest posting: A/Prof Josh Davis, Infectious Diseases Physician, John Hunter Hospital,  NSW, Principal  Research Fellow, Menzies School of Health Research, NT, Australia. Hepatitis C Virus ID_Micro tute August 2016 HCV treatment John Hunter Hospital ID meeting 2016

Hepatitis C and Hepatitis B : localised Hunter New England HealthPathways live now!

Please consult HealthPathways for up-to-date advice on patient management and referral pathways for active treatment.  If logon details for HP required, please contact aimed site administrator -jferguson@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au Dr Josh Davis from Newcastle also provided these updates on viral hepatitis with clear messages for general practice – a good starting point. Excerpt from Hepatitis C pathway:  General practitioners […]

Hepatitis C infection – the coming revolution

Special Guest post from Dr Joshua Davis, Senior Staff Specialist Infectious Diseases: We are on the cusp of a revolution in the way we treat Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection. HCV matters, as it is common (about 1.5% of Australian adults are infected), and 20-30% of those infected end up with cirrhosis or liver cancer […]