Tag Archives: microbiome

You are what you eat – or should our gut microbiome be considered an important body system in its own right?

Guest posting: Assoc. Prof. Josh Davis,  Principal Research Fellow/NHMRC Career Development Fellow, Menzies School of Health Research, Senior Staff Specialist Infectious Diseases Physician, John Hunter Hospital, Conjoint Professor School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle The diverse bacterial communities which live in our gastrointestinal tract (primary in the colon), are collectively known as the “gut microbiota” and their collective […]

Meningitis: An unexpected adverse effect of antibiotics

Another recent case-control study examining the effects of antimicrobial prescribing on the microbiome and how it affects human health has recently been published. This study aimed to determine if antibiotic prescriptions in the previous year resulted in an increased risk of meningitis.

Are faecal transplants the answer?

Faecal transplants are recommended for all sorts of ailments these days. Indications recommended (not always by doctors!) include weight loss, inflammatory bowel disease and autism. The best evidence for faecal transplants, however, is in the treatment of C. difficile disease.

Can you develop antibiotic resistance without antibiotics?

Studies of an indigenous tribe from the Amazon who had no previous contact with Europeans have shown you can!